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Seven Star Marine: Newport, Rhode Island's Source for Marine Engineering


I had the great good fortune of growing up on the waterfront in my father’s marine business. It was an immersive, hands-on experience that captured my imagination from the start. What more could a boy want than to be surrounded by boats, engines, and an endless stream of fascinating characters? Dad and his partner started out of a shack at the top of the dock, where my folks had been living aboard their boat, carrying charter guests for day sails and dinner cruises. The America’s Cup races in the 70’s and early 80’s brought people by the droves, all looking to get out on the water.


Newport harbor was at the intersection of significant forces that were rapidly changing the working waterfront i...

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Trade Stories: Three Generations In the Wheelhouse of a Tugboat



The blue-and-yellow tugs of Western Towboat are fixtures in the Seattle area. But harbor work on the West Coast is only a fraction of the company’s business. Its biggest job is freighting more than a billion pounds of goods each year to Alaska.

By Will Grant

The lifeline for Southeast Alaska begins in the Lower 48. Most of the coastal communities along the Last Frontier’s panhandle have exactly zero roads connecting them to the outside world. Which means that nearly everything (except fresh fish, native salmonberries, and a few other goods) must come by water, most of it packed in containers at a Seattle dock, stacked six-high on a barge, and towed north through the Inland Passage.

“That’s ho...Read More

Corey Forrest: Fishing Rhode Island

Corey Forrest: Fishing Rhode Island


As a little girl, I didn’t know I was going to grow up to be a fisherman, or follow in my father’s footsteps, and his father’s footsteps.  It was a man’s world at the dock of Sakonnet Point, no women working in sight. The faces of fishing, as I recall, were a blue-collar gang of burley, brutish men, unkept in their oilskins, fish scales hanging from their beards, and cigarettes dangling from their mouths. There was unfiltered grumbling of men sorting, weighing, boxing and icing, as the fish were shoveled off the boat onto a conveyor belt. Most hadn’t had a day off in forty days, were probably hungover, definitely in need of sleep, and completely indifferent about offending any passersby or f...

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Filson Food: Whiskey Cured Salmon Gravlax

Filson Food: Whiskey Cured Salmon Gravlax


Making cured fish is incredibly simple, but requires intentional time to prepare. Gravlax, a preparation of preserving salmon from the cold coast of Scandinavia, is cured in salt and sugar for just a few days. This recipe has been adapted from my grandpa’s handwritten notes, a treasure shared in my family. Gravlax celebrates the fish with its brilliant color, delicate texture, and rich flavor, making for a delicious addition to any meal. Serve it for breakfast, atop toast for lunch, or as an appetizer with soft cheese and rye bread.

Ingredients:
1 lb fillet of wild salmon, skin on and pin bones removed
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
¼ cup Kosher Salt
¼ cup Sugar
½ teaspoon Pepper
1 Tablespoon Brown Sugar
½ ...

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In Print: Matthew Nienow and Good Story Paddleboards


I reeked of   the sea and had nothing to show for it.
Darkling saltwater for a dream
and no other place to be (29-31)
Excerpt from “In the Year of No Work” by Matthew Nienow

To enter into Matthew Nienow’s workshop is to walk back in time. Wood shavings lie coiled in heaps on the floor, the smell of freshly cut lumber permeates the air and a sense that things move slowly here settles comfortably in your chest. And then there are the paddleboards. They are everywhere; leaned up against walls, in racks stacked three high, some finished, some waiting in various states of construction. Matthew emerges from a corner of the shop. He is quiet, rugged, tall, his handshake firm. His hands are those of a w...

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3 ways to open an oyster without a shucking knife


While a shucking knife is always recommended to open oysters, it’s not the only way. If a fresh bivalve opportunity presents itself while you’re without a shucking knife, you might try to break in using one of these alternative methods.

1. Fire
Heat is a great way to open an oyster, and the safest way to do so without a shucking knife. Cook oysters with the cupped side down, and the hinge end towards you. If an oyster gets too hot and pops open, this helps ensure any steam or sharp contents are sent the opposite direction. A closed oyster on a campfire or grill will steam its way open in about 15 minutes.

Hama Hama Oysters shares some grilling tips here.


2. Paring Knife 
A paring knife can also o...

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Filson Food: Pickled Wild Salmon

Filson Food: Pickled Wild Salmon


Pickled salmon is a tradition that runs deep in Alaska, preserving the summer’s harvest to last through the cold winter. It’s become a staple in my fridge, there is always a jar tucked back there - even in our tiny space on the fishing boat during the salmon season. Wild salmon is an incredibly healthy protein and pickled fish makes for a nutritious bite anytime of day. The ocean provides the world with one of our last truly wild foods and and I encourage you to source wild salmon when finding fish to eat. Alaska carefully manages its fisheries for a future of sustainability and choosing wild Alaska salmon supports hundreds of hardworking small boat fishermen and coastal communities. Onboard...

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Filson Food: Campfire Grilled Citrus Salmon


During the summer salmon season, I work with my partner Michael onboard a small commercial fishing boat in Southcentral Alaska. Tuned into the tides, weather, and ocean currents that pull the fish back to the rivers, we chase the harvest of abundant wild salmon swimming through Alaska’s cold, clean water. The daylight lasts forever and when there is a moment with a break from fishing, you’ll find us with the boat pulled up on some beach starting a fire with driftwood, a slab of fresh salmon on hand. As the fish slows cooks over the coals, fingers burn sampling bites of the brilliant red fillet. The fish flakes apart and melts on your tongue with a salty, smoky flavor.

This time of year, as wi...

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In Print: Patrick Manary

In Print: Patrick Manary


Patrick Manary is an Oregon native, lanky, with piercing blue eyes and a wild beard. Thoughtful and soft-spoken, he holds himself with the steady confidence that brutal outdoor work can impart. For the past few years he has moved seasonally, splitting his time between Bristol Bay, Alaska and Tillamook Bay, Oregon. He works in Oregon through the frigid coastal winters before heading up to Alaska for the summer salmon run. “Diving and salmon fishing are my two main jobs now” Patrick explains. “Being in the water, it takes your mind away from everything - you’re focused on finding things - you’re not in today’s world, you’re in the natural environment.”


Patrick hasn’t always been in this industr...

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In Print: Eric Jackson's Snow, Surf and Steelhead


Eric Jackson is always ready for a challenge. You may recognize him from the massive hucks in his latest snowboarding film, Alignment. Or perhaps you’ve seen photos of him fly-fishing some of the most pristine rivers in the world as a sponsored fisherman. Either way, “envy” might describe how you feel about it his life.

Where do you call home?
My wife and I live in Bellingham, Washington. We’ve lived here for a few years and moved up from Mammoth, CA, though I’ve spent a lot of years traveling up here.

What brought you to the Northwest?
The NW has the mountains that I like to ride and the rivers I like to fish. I’d actually wanted to move to the Northwest since I was pretty young. I’ve been comi...

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