• After Wildfire by Ashlee Langholz
  • Working the Earth by Becca Skinner
  • Mossy Oak® Gamekeeper Kennels by Sam Raetz
 
   
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Crossing Community Lines

Crossing Community Lines


When it comes to the outdoors, Lindsey Elliott does it all- climbing, mountain biking, hunting, fly fishing, raising chickens, growing food, practicing citizen science, and running a business, Wylder Goods. Because she has perspective from multiple and oftentimes separate communities, we asked Lindsey to share her thoughts from the cross-section.

Photos and words by Lindsey Elliott, Interviewed by Ashlee Langholz

You’ve spoken before about being a member of a “new generation of hunters and anglers.”  What can you tell us about this new generation from your point of view?

There is a growing number of newcomers to the hunting and angling side of the outdoor industry. I, am one of them. Though I g...

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Celebrating the Rivers of America

Celebrating the Rivers of America


When I need to brighten my day, I go to the river. I walk along the shore or sit for awhile at the water's edge and listen to the swish, or the babble, or the exciting bubbly rush of flow. Always moving when the rest of the landscape is still, the river holds me rapt, and if I stare long enough, it mesmerizes and takes me away to a special place where the rest of the world—along with its eternal complications, everyday demands, and political disappointments—seems like a thousand miles away. And floating on the river is even better, drifting with the current wherever it goes.

Part of the appeal of rivers likely has an evolutionary context: our bodies are nearly 70 percent water, and every drop...

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After Wildfire

After Wildfire


A bike-pack fishing trip through a scorched landscape was not the trip that Ashlee thought she was going to take - but the things she saw and the experience she had left an impression about how we interact with the landscape after wildfire.

“Lucky for you, all the goat’s head burned too,” someone said, smiling, as we pedaled up the gravel Deschutes River Railbed trail. My husband and I had been warned of the tire-slicing vines. I had spent the prior evening squeezing liquid sealant into my tire tubes. We camped near the start of the trail, where the Deschutes meets the Columbia, surrounded by lush green grass and tall alder trees. We awoke as usual, or as usual as one can in a campground whil...

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Working With the Earth

Working With the Earth

In the summer and early fall, my fiance, Eduardo Garcia and I wake early at our home in Bozeman, Montana. Between running our own businesses, we manage our ½ acre food forest, a permaculture garden that feeds us for eight months of the year. During the warm seasons, work days don’t stop at 5pm and weekends don’t exist, but it’s all worth it to know we are living more sustainably.


Working with the earth is a chemistry equation of timing, weather and soil science. I’ve botched that equation many times. That’s part of the learning curve of working with living things. My hope is that each year, I can better read the natural signs and become a stronger farmer.


Weather and changing seasons are a cha...
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Mossy Oak Gamekeeper Kennels

Mossy Oak Gamekeeper Kennels


Words are wasted on trying to describe the relationship between bird dog and owner. From the euphoria of lifting a mallard out of your retriever’s trained mouth for the first time, to the grief that comes with their inevitable passing years later, the journey must be experienced to be known. The first few years of a hunting dog’s life are without a doubt the most critical. It’s in this time where expectations are set and groundwork is laid for transforming a puppy into a functional member of both the household and the duck blind. Training a puppy into a working bird dog is an undertaking that many don’t have the time, knowledge, or patience for. Instead, sending your dog to a capable trainer...

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The Democracy of The Wild with Jim Posewitz


In August of 1953, 18-year-old Jim Posewitz stepped off an overnight train onto the platform in Bozeman, Montana. He’d come west for the first time on a scholarship to play football for the Montana State College Bobcats. Over the next few years, Jim, known as “Poz”, would prove to be a pretty darn good football player, his college career culminating with the Bobcats undefeated ‘56 season and first ever National Championship. But this championship, while noteworthy, would be a small footnote to an extraordinary life dedicated to a higher calling.

Poz writes about the moment he knew Montana was home in his recent memoir, My Best Shot. It was in November and he’d accompanied a teammate home to N...

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Q and A with Josh Raggio of Raggio Custom Calls

Q and A with Josh Raggio of Raggio Custom Calls


Raggio Custom Calls is based in Raymond, Mississippi and creates custom, handmade duck calls. Founded and owned by Josh Raggio, no two calls are made the same. We sat down with Josh to get the story of his business and what drives his passion for ducks.

What made you decide to make your first duck call?
My dad was a duck hunter and he loved calling. He was blowing a duck call all year, nonstop. Inside or outside — he actually carried a call everywhere he went in his pocket. Naturally, I wanted to learn the art of calling. At a young age he showed me how to correctly present air into the call in order to make the right sounds. My father was in the competition call scene and eventually became th...

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Plant a Tree, Grow a Forest

Plant a Tree, Grow a Forest



Greg Peters is the Communications Director for the National Forest Foundation. This year they have launched an initiative to replant 50 million trees in areas that have been burned or affected by insect infestations, disease or other natural causes. Here, he shares a story of a recent trip into the hills and a
first-hand encounter with the beginnings of a forest fire. 

Disoriented and confused, my eyes fluttered open. Lightning flashed in my periphery and I felt a few light raindrops hit my sleeping bag. “Damn,” I thought, “We’ll have to sleep inside.” Thunder boomed in the distance and I willed myself fully awake.

“Holy shit!” Aaron called out. “Ben, wake up.”

Ben, our friend and host, was sle...

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Robertson Stykbow: Traditional Archery with Dick Robertson


Dick Robertson is the owner and founder of Robertson Stykbow in Forest Grove, MT. Dick has been designing and crafting some of the most beautiful and high-performance traditional bows for the last twenty-five years. We sent Joel Caldwell to spend a few days on the Robertson ranch to discover the passions of the man behind the bows.

Dick Robertson believes in manifestation, though he doesn’t use the term. “If you want something to happen, you have to think about it, talk about it,” he tells me firmly. Before a hunt in Alaska’s Brooks Range, he did just that and ultimately took a sheep with a bow he’d made himself from animal sinew and yew wood. No small feat with such a primitive weapon. What’...

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Filson Food: Venison and Licorice Pie

Filson Food: Venison and Licorice Pie


Connor Gabbott spent the first 20 years of his career in various restaurant kitchens across British Columbia. Since picking up a rifle and harvesting his first deer in 2010, Connor has set out to combine his love for food and wild places by sharing the stories of his adventures and how they provide meals for the table. We had Connor tell us about a few of his favorite recipes that we can take into our own kitchens at home. This is the third recipe of a three part series.

There is a certain magic that happens when you cook over open flame, and I for one can’t get enough of it. No where is it more evident than when you are cooking a braised dish for hours low and slow. The same woodsmoke that b...

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