• A day on the Hell's Canyon mail boat by David Frame
  • John Finley: Wyoming's Cowboy Artist by Erin Connery
  • 70 Years of Seattle Mountain Rescue by Ashlee Langholz
 
   
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Duck Band: Friendship, Music, and Hunting


Friendships tend to be tribal in their origins - shared interests, hobbies, and lifestyles attract and keep folks together. For this group of friends, their love of music and duck hunting are the ties that bind. 

“Would you have any interest in going on a duck hunt in Louisiana with us?” That seems like an innocuous-enough question to ask somebody. But those of us who are obsessed with the sound of whistling wings and the smell of a wet, muddy retriever know better.  We can see the trap being laid. I was texting with my friend Buddy Melton, an avid grouse, turkey, and bear hunter from the mountains of western North Carolina, when I asked the question. “Sure. I’ve never duck hunted but always ...

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A Day on the Hell's Canyon Mail Boat

A Day on the Hell's Canyon Mail Boat


“The U.S. Postal Service will deliver mail to anywhere in the United States with a mailing address,” says Jill Koch, part owner and operator of Beamers Hells Canyon Tours. Jill and her husband Jim hold the mail delivery contract for what may be one of the most remote mail routes in the lower 48.

Once a week via jet boat, they deliver mail to the dozen or so ranches and year round residents that live within the deepest gorge in North America. Jim and Jill have been doing this for the last 25 years; 2019 marks the 100-year anniversary of mail service within Hells Canyon. Nowadays, internet in the canyon is common and residents are able to place orders and communicate with the outside world in w...

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John Finley: Wyoming's Cowboy Artist

John Finley: Wyoming's Cowboy Artist


The Wind River Range rises from the river itself, fall shifting into winter as my truck reaches the outskirts of the town of Dubois. I slow at the town museum, looking at the life-sized bronze cowboy sculpture, one of many of John Finley’s fixtures in town. I stop for a coffee at the Perch, a local coffee house, and make my way out of Dubois. A driveway marked by an old barrel indicates I’ve made it to the Finley ranch. For over 100 years, John Finley’s family has homesteaded on this land, ranching and guiding big game hunts and dabbling as artists. Today, John may be equally well known as Wyoming’s Cowboy artist, creating sculpture, children’s books, watercolor paintings, acrylic paintings ...

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70 Years of Seattle Mountain Rescue

70 Years of Seattle Mountain Rescue


Imagine for a moment you’re miles deep into your favorite backcountry and you’re unable to get out. It’s 1936. You’re using gear that today sits in vintage displays-- leather boots, knickers, wooden ice axes. You don’t have a cell phone or locator beacon. There’s no SOS button, no 911. Back then, there was Ome Daiber.

Call Ome
The American Alpine Journal called Seattle-based Ome Daiber, the “Father of Mountain Rescue.” In 1935, Daiber made the first ascent of Mount Rainier’s Liberty Ridge with Arne Campbell and Will Borrow. A year later he was asked to help in a winter search for Delmar Fadden, a young climber who perished during a solo climb of Mount Rainier. After that, Daiber developed a li...

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Horse-Logging Vermont's Northeast Kingdom

Horse-Logging Vermont's Northeast Kingdom


“When I’d work for the old farmers around here I was so amazed by their lifestyle,” he says. “Their lives revolved around their farms and family. When you meet someone who is content—it really rubs off on you. They were like kings of their own little kingdoms.”

When Neil Fromm was twenty-five years old he drove his Volkswagen van from the Florida Keys up to Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. Known to Vermonters simply as “The Kingdom,” this mountainous, sparsely populated area is situated between the Connecticut River and the Green Mountains. Fromm, now fifty, is tall and solidly built, still looking the college basketball player he was three decades ago. “I moved to Marsfield and quickly met a guy...

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Cooper River Trail

Cooper River Trail


Some of us like hiking and some of us like fishing; a lot of us like both. The Cooper River Trail is the perfect trail for those who like both. Just outside of Cle Elum, WA, the Cooper River Trail is just that, a trail that follows along the Cooper River. Because of this, it lends itself to plenty of stops to set up the rod and cast a fly. The trail winds through old growth forest while following alongside the river. At the halfway point of this roughly eight-mile trail, you will come to the expansive Cooper Lake, the source of the flowing river you followed on your journey to this point. The lake is a great spot to cast flies on the flat water in hopes to fool one of the local trout. If you...Read More

Franklin Falls Trail

Franklin Falls Trail


If you’re in the mood for a quick hike before work or an afternoon jaunt through the forest, Franklin Falls is a great option for those of us based in the Seattle area. This short two-mile trail has a lot of features for its brief length. It follows along the South Fork of the Snoqualmie River as you romp through the beautiful Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. There is a collection of small cabins that are scattered throughout the area at the beginning of the trail as well. Eventually you will come to the 70-foot cascade of water that is Franklin Falls. This trail is a great option for anyone who just needs a quick escape from the hustle and quick pace of life in the city.









Photography by ...

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Heliotrope Ridge Trail

Heliotrope Ridge Trail


The Heliotrope Ridge trail is a roughly 6 mile roundtrip trail that features a beautiful walk through an old growth forest, several creek crossings, and an up close and personal look at the Coleman Glacier. The end of the trail is somewhat of a choose-your-own-adventure. You can turn around at your first view of the glacier or you can continue uphill to get even closer to the glacier. If you’re inclined and equipped, there are also several places to set up camp and go to sleep to the crunching and creaking sound of the moving glacier. Or you can do what we did and hike down, drive up a Forest Service Road, and find an established campsite at which to setup for the evening.










Photography by Ben ...

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Crossing Community Lines

Crossing Community Lines


When it comes to the outdoors, Lindsey Elliott does it all- climbing, mountain biking, hunting, fly fishing, raising chickens, growing food, practicing citizen science, and running a business, Wylder Goods. Because she has perspective from multiple and oftentimes separate communities, we asked Lindsey to share her thoughts from the cross-section.

Photos and words by Lindsey Elliott, Interviewed by Ashlee Langholz

You’ve spoken before about being a member of a “new generation of hunters and anglers.”  What can you tell us about this new generation from your point of view?

There is a growing number of newcomers to the hunting and angling side of the outdoor industry. I, am one of them. Though I g...

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Celebrating the Rivers of America

Celebrating the Rivers of America


When I need to brighten my day, I go to the river. I walk along the shore or sit for awhile at the water's edge and listen to the swish, or the babble, or the exciting bubbly rush of flow. Always moving when the rest of the landscape is still, the river holds me rapt, and if I stare long enough, it mesmerizes and takes me away to a special place where the rest of the world—along with its eternal complications, everyday demands, and political disappointments—seems like a thousand miles away. And floating on the river is even better, drifting with the current wherever it goes.

Part of the appeal of rivers likely has an evolutionary context: our bodies are nearly 70 percent water, and every drop...

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